COSA FW: REMINDER: Webinar ? Rainfall thresholds for post-fire runoff/ erosion

Posted
Southern Rockies Fire Science
Webinar Reminder
Rainfall thresholds for post-fire runoff
and erosion from plot to watershed scale
August 7, 2017
View this email in your browser

Subscribe to these emails!

Click HERE to forward

Logo Southern Rockies Fire Science Network
Wildland Fire Science Information From Mesas To Mountains
REMINDER – REGISTER FOR WEBINAR THIS WEDNESDAY:

Rainfall thresholds for post-fire runoff and
erosion from plot to watershed scale

Presenter: Codie Wilson, Department of Geosciences, Colorado State Univiersity

Colorado’s Front Range watersheds provide municipal water supplies for downstream communities. Many of these watersheds have been affected by erosion and sedimentation after wildfire, and managers need information on the frequency and duration of post-fire runoff and erosion problems.
typical instrumented sediment trap and weir at the outlet of a catchment
A typical instrumented sediment trap and weir at catchment outlet

The empty catchment after sediment removal

The catchment with sediment from August 19, 2004, rain event. (Photos by Robichaud et al 2013 b)

WHEN
August 9, 2017 – 12:00 PM MDT

WHERE:
Register online
OR
Room 300, Lory Student Center
(12 – 1 PM MDT, 3rd floor, all the way to the south end of building)
Colorado State University

WHAT
Research objectives:

  • Identify whether or not runoff and erosion can be predicted by rainfall thresholds within three recent Colorado Front Range fires
  • Examine whether thresholds change with time since burn, spatial extent, and post-fire treatments such as mulch applications
  • Develop a tool for Colorado to estimate the frequency of threshold exceedance in future fire areas

WHO
Authors: Codie Wilson, Stephanie Kampf, Joe Wagenbrenner

WHY ATTEND?

  • Improve your understanding of the likely frequency of rainfall events that will cause runoff and erosion after wildfire.
  • Help plan for post-fire flooding or sediment problems and prioritize treatments to those areas with lower thresholds and higher frequencies of threshold exceedance
REGISTER
Twitter
Twitter
Website
Website
Email
Email
Facebook
Facebook
Alluvial fan following the Buffalo Creek Fire
The Buffalo Creek Fire in May 1996 burned 4,690 hectares in the mountains southwest of Denver, Colorado. This wildfire lowered the erosion threshold of the watershed. As a consequence of this wildfire, a 100-year rainstorm in July 1996 caused erosion upstream and deposition of this alluvial fan at the mouth of a tributary to Buffalo Creek. Photo by R. H. Meade
NoCircleNoText052113.jpg

Contact Us
Questions, comments, concerns, research?

Contact Gloria Edwards, Coordinator
gloria.edwards
(970) 491-2991

www.southernrockiesfirescience.org

Copyright © 2017 Southern Rockies Fire Science Network All Rights Reserved.

subscribe unsubscribe update subscription preferences

open.php?u=2263fe298f4df255d22b80097&id=2b5517d84f&e=09796e04da